Domaine Du Mas Blanc Clos Du Moulin Collioure 2004

Domaine Mas Blanc 2004 Clos Du Moulin Collioure, and my ham and leek fritatta

Domaine Du Mas Blanc 2004 Clos Du Moulin Collioure, and my ham and leek frittata

I’m still laughing over this article, and hence will try not to bore you with stuffy or overwraught descriptors, even if this is entry is about a fine wine. That being said, I also hope I never have.  And on with it then.

I am fairly pleased with myself at the moment, having executed a quick, but potentially disastrous recipe. Believe me, I have killed a few promising omelettes in the very few minutes one has to pull it off. I think it comes down to having made the prudent decision to not flip it until it was done and out of being finished off in the broiler. I love to cook and always have, from my days of loading mom and dad’s fridge with 20 different experimental salad dressings to attempting chicken Francaise or whatever the mood called for. Dad made me into a foodie like himself quite early, though one who actually likes to cook the food. My parents also worked late often, so having a more advanced palate meant doing my best to recreate cuisine instead of chicken nuggets or mac and cheese. But while it usually tasted good, we all know execution is just as important. So, bravo! (this time, at least). Not bad for no formal training. Maybe its because I donned the new chef shirt dad got me.

But the real occasion here is the wine. This was one of the wines I’d been saving, but I think almost 10 years is something that I can live with enjoying without too much guilt. Note that I did not patiently watch it age almost ten years, but it still counts. I won this wine at a charity auction along with a nice 2007 Ch. Climens Barsac and a Nuits-St-Georges. So now I can also enjoy it with good conscience. The other two better watch out. I’ve got a taste for the more expensive stuff lately.

I took out the decanter and let it breathe for about an hour. All the key factors for ageworthiness were there: bright acidity and at least medium tannins and fruit, but already perfectly integrated at this stage. The red fruit was soft, but entirely present. It poured a deep ruby, and on the nose were prune, black cherry, white pepper, tobacco, earth and saddle leather aromas. The palate echoed these aromas, along with a full mouthfeel and finish. Complex, yet not heavy. Rich, but not too much so. Another review I read called it ‘rustic’, which I think is accurate. Also noted was that it is very chocolate-friendly, so I’m going to have one last treat with this one before bed.

The Collioure appellation is part of the Languedoc-Roussilon region in the south of France where hotter temperatures suit this late-ripening grape and hence this is 13% abv.  Like its Bandol counterparts, this particular wine is primarily Mourvèdre, at about 80% (also known as Monastrell in nearby Spain and Mataró elsewhere). It is quite popular in this region, and recently it has found new fame in the USA thanks to the “Rhône Rangers”. This Domaine Du Mas Blanc averages around 90 points, depending who you ask. Average price is around $35-$45. This producer, Dr. Parcé, is known for quality over the last 25 years at least. I am certainly enjoying it.

While I could have spent more time cooking a quiche or tarte, the frittata had everything French I was looking for to pair with the wine. Ham, gruyere, leek, and herbs. Filling, yet not too heavy. Perfect together.

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3 responses to “Domaine Du Mas Blanc Clos Du Moulin Collioure 2004

  1. Have been to Coulioure and would insert a picture or two if I knew how. Lovely town with not as many wineries as you might think but a very cool beach and fortress. Those that are there are great wines with super structure but focused on the fruit and the smell of the land. I haven’t had this particular wine but will look it up. Thanks.

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